Indian Monsoon Season



As the Indian Monsoon Season has just begun, running from 1st June 2016 to the end of September 2016, our Indian partners have outlined some important packing preventative measures for all importers and exporters.
  • All cargo be that Air or Sea freight should be adequately packed, palletised and shrink wrapped, which will help prevent cargo from getting wet and damp.
  • Proper packing material should be used to withstand the sea or airfreight journey.
  • All cargo must be shrink wrapped properly.
  • All wooden cases and pallets needs to be fumigated (unless otherwise stated), this will help prevent mold, moisture and dampness
  • Ensure your Marine Insurance Policy is current 
In addition, it has  been highlighted that during the Monsoon season port congestion and trucking delays can be an issue  and it has been suggested that all cargo is packed appropriately, transported and customs cleared well in advance of the port / airport cut off times. 


Disclaimer- All information / contents are for general information only. ICE does not make any guarantee on completeness, reliability and accuracy of this information. We strongly suggest you seek further advice before acting on any content / information

Change in USA Import Customs document regulations


Change in USA Import Customs document regulations
 
 
U.S Customs will no longer allow PALLET count shown on documentation for inbound shipments to the U.S.
The following message was issues by U.S. Customs as a reminder:
 
"Effective April 10, 2016, U.S. Customs will not allow to show "Pallet" on the import documentation, including M BL, H BL, D AWB, H AWB, Manifest, Commercial Invoice, Packing list, AMS, ISF, and/or any other related document”.
The numbers and quantities from the carrier's ocean bills of lading, either the Mater or the House, as applicable, must transmit the quantity of the lowest external packaging unit; containers and pallets are NOT acceptable manifested quantities; for example a container containing 10 pallets with 200 cartons MUST be manifested as 200 cartons.
Should you have any questions regarding this please contact your ICE team member on
1300 CARGO1  
 
Disclaimer- All information / contents are for general information only. ICE does not make any guarantee on completeness, reliability and accuracy of this information. We strongly suggest you seek further advice before acting on any content / information
 

ASEAN Australia-New Zealand Free Trade Agreement (AANZFTA) First Protocol

ASEAN Australia-New Zealand Free Trade Agreement (AANZFTA) First Protocol

 

The following information has been advised by the Victorian Chamber of Commerce and Industry.

As of 1st April, the normal AANZFTA Certificate is no longer acceptable for the following destinations:

§  Australia

§  New Zealand

§  Brunei

§  Burma (Myanmar)

§  Laos

§  Malaysia

§  Philippines

§  Singapore

§  Thailand

§  Vietnam

Cambodia and Indonesia are expected to accept the new AANZFTA1 template after 1st July 2016.


Disclaimer- All information / contents are for general information only. ICE does not make any guarantee on completeness, reliability and accuracy of this information. We strongly suggest you seek further advice before acting on any content / information

Patrick Side-loader Fee removed

Effective 1st May 2015 Patrick has decided to remove the Side-loader fee that was introduced on the 8th February 2013. 

The Side-loader fee came into play when both stevedores identified additional costs related to the safe loading of containers and used this as the foundation to push for additional fee.

Freight & Trade Alliance (FTA) along with road transport sector have had their focus on removing the Patrick side-loader fee as they highlighted the knock on effect this levy would have on direct deliveries from wharf to importers and the impact on smaller transport operators.

It has been stated that “FTA is continuing advocacy with stakeholders in an aim to remove this fee from other stevedore operations”



Disclaimer- All information / contents are for general information only. ICE does not make any guarantee on completeness, reliability and accuracy of this information. We strongly suggest you seek further advice before acting on any content / information.   
The Importance of marine insurance

Almost every importer and exporter has asked themselves and their freight forwarders if marine insurance is necessary.  The below article written by Andrew Tulloch a maritime Lawyer and who’s practice focus on trade and transport law, supply chain & logistics will explain just how important marine insurance is to a business.

Published 25 February 2015
Marine insurance: do I really need it on my imports and exports?
By Andrew Tulloch
In brief - Importing and exporting businesses' success and survival may depend on marine insurance
When considering the terms of sale or purchase for imports and exports, think about the best terms to allow control over the insurance risk and cost. Failure to do so could bring about the demise of your business.
Going without marine insurance carries major risk
Many small business owners have asked their insurance brokers if they need marine insurance and have received the inevitable answer: "Of course you do". But have they been really convinced that it is money well spent? As a maritime lawyer, I believe that it is foolish to do without it and I've sketched a typical scenario to show why.
You are the producer of leading edge widgets. A falling Australian dollar means that you are now able to match the price of your leading foreign competitor with a superior product. The Australian market is too small for the potential of your widget, so you investigate marketing overseas. You find an agent in Germany who wants to sell your widgets into Europe. You agree to send the first container load of widgets to this agent as a test shipment to see how the initial sales interest goes.
The loaded container of widgets (valued at $100,000) is dispatched from Melbourne aboard the ship "Good Luck", owned and operated by Wishmeluck Shipping. This shipment was arranged for you by Fast Freight Forwarding, which issues you with shipping documents.
One week after dispatch, you hear from Fast Freight Forwarding that "Good Luck" struck very bad weather on its voyage to Hamburg and your container was lost overboard. It is suggested that you contact your marine insurer. But you don't have one! You had decided that the cost of marine insurance was a bit high and, as this was a trial shipment, it was something you would look at again once you had established whether exporting was a "goer" for your business.
Freight forwarder and carrier deny liability
You send an email to Fast Freight Forwarding demanding compensation for the loss of your container. Fast Freight Forwarding denies all liability and says you need to address your claim to Wishmeluck Shipping. You do that. Wishmeluck Shipping denies liability, saying the vessel encountered extreme weather conditions and that, under the Hague-Visby Rules, they have no liability for loss caused by a "peril of the sea".
You are left to carry a loss of $100,000 and your export plans are in tatters. Your agent in Germany loses interest in marketing your widgets. The loss ultimately leads to the winding up of your company.
 Marine insurer settles claim, maritime lawyer seeks compensation from carrier
If you'd had marine insurance, your insurer would have been immediately notified by your broker and, once satisfied that the loss had occurred as advised, would settle your claim for the full value of the goods, plus freight and insurance costs, plus a further 10% (if agreed).
Your marine insurer would then instruct a maritime lawyer to deal with the freight forwarder or shipping company and to seek compensation, with a view to minimising its loss on your account.
The likelihood is that any recovery from the shipping company or forwarder would be severely limited, by the argument regarding the "perils of the sea" defence and by the monetary limitations that apply.
Limitation is generally based upon either the weight of the cargo or the number of packages set out on the shipping documents. The limit for shipments from Australia is currently the higher of approximately AU$3.50 per kilo of the gross weight of goods lost or damaged or AU$1,170 per package or unit. Accordingly, if you have either a very light cargo or very few packages in your consignment, the limitation will seriously affect your potential recovery of compensation.
Carriers exclude liability under applicable international conventions
There are numerous other defences available to carriers under the applicable international conventions that exclude their liability. You no doubt assume that if a carrier's Master runs the vessel aground or collides with another ship, you will be fully compensated for your loss. Wrong. Error in the navigation or management of the ship will normally provide a complete defence to the claim, even though it would seem that these are precisely the circumstances in which the carrier should be liable.
You are far better to claim on your marine insurance and leave your insurer to worry about seeking compensation from the carrier.
The same applies for both imports and exports. If you sell CIF (cost, insurance and freight) and buy CFR (cost and freight) or FOB (free onboard) and arrange your own marine insurance for the purchased goods, you have control over the insurance arrangements. You can deal directly with an Australian marine insurer. This is often easier than dealing with an overseas marine insurer in, for example, China, India or South America. Your marine insurance broker will be keen to assist you.
Protect your import or export business with marine insurance
So, the next time you consider the terms of sale or purchase for imports and exports, you should also think about the best terms to allow you to control the insurance risk and cost. After all, you wouldn't risk not insuring your home. Why wouldn't you take the same care to protect your business?
Take it from a maritime lawyer who deals with these situations for a living. Marine insurance is an essential element in the success and survival of a business involved with imports or exports.

For further information and advice on per shipment or annual marine insurance please contact your ICE representative or call us on 1300CARGO1 (1300 227 461).


Disclaimer- All information / contents are for general information only. ICE does not make any guarantee on completeness, reliability and accuracy of this information. We strongly suggest you seek further advice before acting on any content / information

Queensland Weather Warnings


Due to serve weather warnings our ICE Brisbane office has been closed for the day and will open on Monday 23rd Feb.

Should you require urgent assistance please feel free to contact one of our other branches.

Sydney: (02) 9669-7800
Melbourne: (03) 8374 8200
Fremantle: (08) 9430-7822
 
ANL New Trans- Tasman Service
 
ANL has announced that a new dedicated three vessel service linking Australian East Cost ports to New Zealand’s North and South Islands will be introduced effective from February 2015.
This new service will be operated under ANL’s “Transtas” branding and will call Sydney, Melbourne, Auckland, Lyttelton, Nelson, Wellington, Tauranga, Sydney on a fixed weekly basis.
This is a result of feedback from their customers/clients requesting a dedicated trans-Tasman option.
John Lines, ANL Managing Director said “ANL is committed to offering our customers a quality service across the Tasman and our new service demonstrates that commitment” he went on to say “We care about our customers, we want their businesses to grow and prosper.  ANL will continue to work hard and do all we can to make this happen”
 
Disclaimer- All information / contents are for general information only. ICE does not make any guarantee on completeness, reliability and accuracy of this information. We strongly suggest you seek further advice before acting on any content / information.